##plugins.themes.bootstrap3.article.main##

Tozun Bahcheli Sid Noel

Abstract

While ethnic kinship and perceived commonality of interests have ensured close relations between Turkish Cypriots and Turkey, the political ties between them have changed significantly over time. From a community that once dutifully followed Turkey’s lead in all matters of political significance – their relationship with Turkey being essentially one of client and patron – Turkish Cypriots have evolved into a community with a distinct political identity, its own democratic institutions, a well-developed sense of its own interests, and leaders who represent and articulate a  Turkish-Cypriot point of view. Though heavily reliant on Turkish financial assistance and other forms of government-to government support, those leaders nevertheless display considerable confidence regarding their capacity to manage their own affairs. In consequence, Turkish-Cypriot relations with Turkey have grown progressively more complex and nuanced, and in certain respects more distant.

##plugins.themes.bootstrap3.article.details##

Keywords

Northern Cyprus, TRNC, Turkish Cypriots, Turkey, identity, democratic consolidation, political parties, elections

References
Bahcheli, T. (1990) Greek-Turkish Relations Since 1955. Boulder CO: Westview Press.

Bahcheli, T. and Noel, S. (2009) ‘The Rise of the AK Party and Ankara’s Changing Role: Paving the Way for the “Yes”’ in Varnava, A. and Faustmann, H. (eds.), Reunifying Cyprus: the Annan Plan and Beyond. New York: I.B. Tauris.

Campbell, A., Converse, P., Miller, W. and Stokes, D. (1960) The American Voter. New York: Wiley.

Constantinou, C.M. (2008) ‘On the Cypriot States of Exception’, International Political Sociology, Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 145-164.

Dodd, C.H. (ed.) (1993) The Political, Social and Economic Development of Northern Cyprus. Huntington UK: Eothen Press.

Guven, E. (2009) Adam: Talatin Kibrisi [My Island: Talat’s Cyprus]. Istanbul: Guven Kitabevi.

Hatay, M. (2005) Beyond Numbers: An Inquiry into the Political Integration of the Turkish ‘Settlers’ in Northern Cyprus. Oslo: International Peace Research Institute.

Lacher, H. and Kaymak, E. (2005) ‘Transforming Identities: Beyond the Politics of Non-Settlement in North Cyprus’, Mediterranean Politics, Vol. 10, No. 2, pp. 147-166.

Linz, J. and Stepan, A. (1996) Problems of Democratic Transition and Consolidation. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Panabianco, A. (1988) Political Parties: Organization and Power. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Patrick, R. (1976) Political Geography and the Cyprus Conflict: 1963-1971. Waterloo, Ontario: Department of Geography Publication Series, No. 4, University of Waterloo, Canada.

Siaroff, A. (2000) Comparative European Party Systems: An Analysis of Parliamentary Elections Since 1945. New York/London: Garland Publishing.

Ramm, C. (2006) ‘Assessing Transnational Renegotiation in the Post-1974 Turkish Cypriot Community: “Cyprus Donkeys”, “Black Beards” and the “EU Carrot’’’, Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 523-542.

Sozen, A. (2005) ‘The Turkish Cypriot Legislative Election of February 2005: The Rise of CTP/BG’, South European Society and Politics, Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 465-475.

Sozen, A. (2009) ‘The Turkish Cypriot Legislative Election of April 2009: Towards the “Last Roll of the Dice” in the Cyprus Conflict?’, South European Society and Politics, Vol. 14, No. 3, pp. 337-350.

United Nations Security Council (2010) Report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Operation in Cyprus, S/2010/264.
Section
Articles